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16

Oct

3eanuts:

February 1, 1987 — see The Complete Peanuts 1987-1990

Huh, so that's how Lucy died … 

3eanuts:

February 1, 1987 — see The Complete Peanuts 1987-1990

Huh, so that's how Lucy died … 

15

Oct

thelegendaryvhs:

Telefon
aka Bells
aka Morderstwo przez telefon
aka Murder by Phone
Director: Michael Anderson
1982
imdb
Film Polski

thelegendaryvhs:

Telefon

aka Bells

aka Morderstwo przez telefon

aka Murder by Phone

Director: Michael Anderson

1982

imdb

Film Polski

sultryspacehookers:

Source - Kate Beaton

13

Oct

asylum-art:

New Backlit Paper Sculptures by Deepti Nair and Harikrishnan Panicker

At Black Book Gallery

“Where I Belong” is a paper cut light box installation work of hand cut watercolor on paper assembled in a shadow box that is backlit with LED lights. The work is a collaboration by Hari & Deepti

08

Oct

erasing:

Maybe a mistake … but maybe not?
(From Undercover Girl #7, 1954.)
wazzzaap:

02

Oct

2headedsnake:

doing-fine.com
Eleanor Davis - Big Cry, gouache on paper

2headedsnake:

doing-fine.com

Eleanor Davis - Big Cry, gouache on paper

29

Sep

"John Henry" by Eleanor Davis
described as “The continuing legacy of violence towards black Americans by whites”

"John Henry" by Eleanor Davis

described as “The continuing legacy of violence towards black Americans by whites”

24

Sep

sistercity73:

Sister City 73 / Book 3 Chapter 2 / Page 044
<  Previous chapter ended on Page 43 / this one continues on Page 45 >
I’m not sure how I had formed an idea of stripper naming conventions at that age, but I’m pretty sure that’s what I thought.
PREVIOUSLY ON SISTER CITY 73:While in 3rd grade, a boy named No asked his Lesbian babysitters how you get a boy to like you more, and they answered, “No clue.”  Romeo is No’s 34 year old godfather who wrote a grade school pageant about his own misadventures embellished with a few extra ex-boyfriends.  No played Romeo in the original performance of the pageant.  He has gotten a bad reputation for being fascinated with horror movie VHS box art.
TRANSCRIPTION:       Sometimes no clue is the best one to follow; as a 4th grader, No sails like the sweet breath of a zen archer into the lungs of a boy and everyone at school loves him for it (except for the teachers).  Can this really be a place so close to uncomfortable dads having to tell their sons that it’s okay to be straight?!  Can we do other than credit the success of Romeo’s pageant, which casually features love between men (which was as real in the playwright’s life during the events portrayed as the Santa he may someday get the opportunity to lie to a child about)? What can being a significant other mean at age 10?  It’s got to be mostly nominal.  I think I remember that the girl I liked at that age was an ex of one of my classmates (empty boxes within empty boxes) and I thought her name was like a stripper’s (though I honestly have no clue how I knew what that was).  No’s boy’s name is One Longfellow.  With the cruel accuracy of a hawk playing fashion chicken, One identifies No—the kid who takes such pleasure in describing gory details to an empty corner of a playground—as the ultimate rhinestoned “world’s best grandma” vest that only he is capable of rocking with the confidence of a man who does not yet know his shirt is inside out.    For his own part, One’s image does not come between No and the page he strives to read, but every time a teacher calls on him, he’s playing with the binder letting of “No One” like the designer of the conquerer’s coin.

sistercity73:

Sister City 73 / Book 3 Chapter 2 / Page 044

<  Previous chapter ended on Page 43 / this one continues on Page 45 >

I’m not sure how I had formed an idea of stripper naming conventions at that age, but I’m pretty sure that’s what I thought.

PREVIOUSLY ON SISTER CITY 73:
While in 3rd grade, a boy named No asked his Lesbian babysitters how you get a boy to like you more, and they answered, “No clue.”  Romeo is No’s 34 year old godfather who wrote a grade school pageant about his own misadventures embellished with a few extra ex-boyfriends.  No played Romeo in the original performance of the pageant.  He has gotten a bad reputation for being fascinated with horror movie VHS box art.

TRANSCRIPTION:
       Sometimes no clue is the best one to follow; as a 4th grader, No sails like the sweet breath of a zen archer into the lungs of a boy and everyone at school loves him for it (except for the teachers).  Can this really be a place so close to uncomfortable dads having to tell their sons that it’s okay to be straight?!  Can we do other than credit the success of Romeo’s pageant, which casually features love between men (which was as real in the playwright’s life during the events portrayed as the Santa he may someday get the opportunity to lie to a child about)?
What can being a significant other mean at age 10?  It’s got to be mostly nominal.  I think I remember that the girl I liked at that age was an ex of one of my classmates (empty boxes within empty boxes) and I thought her name was like a stripper’s (though I honestly have no clue how I knew what that was).  No’s boy’s name is One Longfellow.  With the cruel accuracy of a hawk playing fashion chicken, One identifies No—the kid who takes such pleasure in describing gory details to an empty corner of a playground—as the ultimate rhinestoned “world’s best grandma” vest that only he is capable of rocking with the confidence of a man who does not yet know his shirt is inside out.  
For his own part, One’s image does not come between No and the page he strives to read, but every time a teacher calls on him, he’s playing with the binder letting of “No One” like the designer of the conquerer’s coin.

21

Sep

thedashinghoodlum:

This was my favorite commercial as a kid

(Source: tampire)