Esquire Theme by Matthew Buchanan
Social icons by Tim van Damme

29

Sep

"John Henry" by Eleanor Davis
described as “The continuing legacy of violence towards black Americans by whites”

"John Henry" by Eleanor Davis

described as “The continuing legacy of violence towards black Americans by whites”

24

Sep

sistercity73:

Sister City 73 / Book 3 Chapter 2 / Page 044
<  Previous chapter ended on Page 43 / this one continues on Page 45 >
I’m not sure how I had formed an idea of stripper naming conventions at that age, but I’m pretty sure that’s what I thought.
PREVIOUSLY ON SISTER CITY 73:While in 3rd grade, a boy named No asked his Lesbian babysitters how you get a boy to like you more, and they answered, “No clue.”  Romeo is No’s 34 year old godfather who wrote a grade school pageant about his own misadventures embellished with a few extra ex-boyfriends.  No played Romeo in the original performance of the pageant.  He has gotten a bad reputation for being fascinated with horror movie VHS box art.
TRANSCRIPTION:       Sometimes no clue is the best one to follow; as a 4th grader, No sails like the sweet breath of a zen archer into the lungs of a boy and everyone at school loves him for it (except for the teachers).  Can this really be a place so close to uncomfortable dads having to tell their sons that it’s okay to be straight?!  Can we do other than credit the success of Romeo’s pageant, which casually features love between men (which was as real in the playwright’s life during the events portrayed as the Santa he may someday get the opportunity to lie to a child about)? What can being a significant other mean at age 10?  It’s got to be mostly nominal.  I think I remember that the girl I liked at that age was an ex of one of my classmates (empty boxes within empty boxes) and I thought her name was like a stripper’s (though I honestly have no clue how I knew what that was).  No’s boy’s name is One Longfellow.  With the cruel accuracy of a hawk playing fashion chicken, One identifies No—the kid who takes such pleasure in describing gory details to an empty corner of a playground—as the ultimate rhinestoned “world’s best grandma” vest that only he is capable of rocking with the confidence of a man who does not yet know his shirt is inside out.    For his own part, One’s image does not come between No and the page he strives to read, but every time a teacher calls on him, he’s playing with the binder letting of “No One” like the designer of the conquerer’s coin.

sistercity73:

Sister City 73 / Book 3 Chapter 2 / Page 044

<  Previous chapter ended on Page 43 / this one continues on Page 45 >

I’m not sure how I had formed an idea of stripper naming conventions at that age, but I’m pretty sure that’s what I thought.

PREVIOUSLY ON SISTER CITY 73:
While in 3rd grade, a boy named No asked his Lesbian babysitters how you get a boy to like you more, and they answered, “No clue.”  Romeo is No’s 34 year old godfather who wrote a grade school pageant about his own misadventures embellished with a few extra ex-boyfriends.  No played Romeo in the original performance of the pageant.  He has gotten a bad reputation for being fascinated with horror movie VHS box art.

TRANSCRIPTION:
       Sometimes no clue is the best one to follow; as a 4th grader, No sails like the sweet breath of a zen archer into the lungs of a boy and everyone at school loves him for it (except for the teachers).  Can this really be a place so close to uncomfortable dads having to tell their sons that it’s okay to be straight?!  Can we do other than credit the success of Romeo’s pageant, which casually features love between men (which was as real in the playwright’s life during the events portrayed as the Santa he may someday get the opportunity to lie to a child about)?
What can being a significant other mean at age 10?  It’s got to be mostly nominal.  I think I remember that the girl I liked at that age was an ex of one of my classmates (empty boxes within empty boxes) and I thought her name was like a stripper’s (though I honestly have no clue how I knew what that was).  No’s boy’s name is One Longfellow.  With the cruel accuracy of a hawk playing fashion chicken, One identifies No—the kid who takes such pleasure in describing gory details to an empty corner of a playground—as the ultimate rhinestoned “world’s best grandma” vest that only he is capable of rocking with the confidence of a man who does not yet know his shirt is inside out.  
For his own part, One’s image does not come between No and the page he strives to read, but every time a teacher calls on him, he’s playing with the binder letting of “No One” like the designer of the conquerer’s coin.

21

Sep

thedashinghoodlum:

This was my favorite commercial as a kid

(Source: tampire)

20

Sep

alexhchung:

Cape/Cowl/Create piece by Derek Deal.

I have more pictures here.

19

Sep

18

Sep

free-parking:

Bruno Munari, from Speak Italian: The Fine Art of the Gesture, 1958 (via)

16

Sep

romainlaurent:

One Loop Portrait a Week - #2
Steven Laxton and Arnold Newman’s book
High res here: https://vimeo.com/74496283
www.romain-laurent.com

romainlaurent:

One Loop Portrait a Week - #2

Steven Laxton and Arnold Newman’s book

High res here: https://vimeo.com/74496283

www.romain-laurent.com

13

Sep

(Source: maudit)

12

Sep

ryannorth:

birdlord:

“How do you represent a place where there is no edge?” asked Jeff Carney, director of L.S.U.’s Coastal Sustainability Studio. A wall of his studio on the university’s Baton Rouge campus contained various map-like representations of what he calls South Louisiana’s indeterminate landscape. As Carney put it, “We don’t have a shoreline. We’re not Florida. It’s not like you’re on solid ground and then you step into water.” That “unclear edge,” Carney said, “creates problems with land ownership, insurance, all of these things. We don’t deal with ambiguity very well.”
- Thanks to Ryan for sending me this cool story about the difficulties in mapping the disappearing Louisiana coast!

It’s a really good article!

ryannorth:

birdlord:

“How do you represent a place where there is no edge?” asked Jeff Carney, director of L.S.U.’s Coastal Sustainability Studio. A wall of his studio on the university’s Baton Rouge campus contained various map-like representations of what he calls South Louisiana’s indeterminate landscape. As Carney put it, “We don’t have a shoreline. We’re not Florida. It’s not like you’re on solid ground and then you step into water.” That “unclear edge,” Carney said, “creates problems with land ownership, insurance, all of these things. We don’t deal with ambiguity very well.”

- Thanks to Ryan for sending me this cool story about the difficulties in mapping the disappearing Louisiana coast!

It’s a really good article!